Adventures Abroad

When in Rome: Pizza Al Volo

WheninRome-2

BY MAXIMILIAN KWIATKOWSKI

It is very difficult to find good food in Venice. Most places are tourist traps serving overpriced frozen food, so you need to look very hard to find something good. A good trick is to go into one of the more residential parts of the city. When I was staying in Venice, I was in a small local hotel called Antico Capon, where I found Pizza Al Volo.

Located in the southern sestieri (neighborhood) called Dorsoduro, Pizza Al Volo (Campo Santa Margherita 2944/a) is a cheap option in an otherwise expensive city. Slices are 2,50 euro while a small pizza is only 5 euro.

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The benefit of ordering the whole pizza is that not only do you get more pizza, but it is also made to order. (When is hot, fresh pizza not good?) A friend and I went with three smalls, as we hadn’t eaten much all day. For a small pizza, these things were pretty big. Each one gave us about 10 slices.

The three pizzas we tried were Diabolo, Prosciutto and Vienesse. Diabolo is like an American pepperoni but spicier. The meat had a significant kick to it, but it wasn’t overpowering to my pallet (I like spicy food, though, so perhaps others would disagree). Prosciutto is simply Italian ham. As always, the ham is quite good, albeit kind of bland. The Vienesse pizza was covered in a very bland frankfurter — imagine slicing up a frozen Ballpark-brand dog and spreading it on your pizza. It wasn’t particularly good, but it wasn’t inedible. Stick with the Prosciutto or Diabolo if you visit, though.

The crust was a typical thin Italian crust. While the sauce was kind of lackluster, the cheese was fairly generous. If you are looking for the best pizza go to Naples, not Venice, but this still wasn’t bad.

Honestly, we sort of splurged. A reasonable person could get one small pizza and be fine, and at 5 euro a piece that is definitely not a bad option.

3.5/5

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Ashley Iannantone is a senior biochemistry major with minors in neuroscience, Spanish, and biostatistics. A self-proclaimed foodie with a passion for journalism, this is her fourth year working for The PHOENIX and third year in the A&E section. When she's not hunkering down with a bowl of pasta, you can find her volunteering at St. Joseph Hospital or running along the lake shore path (so that she can eat more pasta).

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