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SGLC candidates 101

The Student Government of Loyola Chicago (SGLC) is gearing up for another round of elections. The PHOENIX has your guide for the candidates that are running for president and vice president in the March 25-26 elections.

 

Michael Fasullo and Mariana Chavez

Photo courtesy of Michael Fasullo and Mariana Chavez.
Photo courtesy of Michael Fasullo and Mariana Chavez.

Who is on this ballot?

Presidential candidate Michael Fasullo is running on the ballot with vice presidential candidate Mariana Chavez. Junior Fasullo and sophomore Chavez are both political science majors.

What past experience do they have?

Chavez spent her sophomore year serving as an SGLC senator. She worked on the Magis Scholarship Initiative and is a member of the Constitutional Review and Justice Committees.

Fasullo is the current vice president of SGLC. He also served on several different committees and is the chair of the Residents, Commuters and Dining Committee.

What is their campaign platform?

“Our platform is all about supporting our Loyola community,” said Fasullo. “Typically, student government candidates say we put students first, and we’re on board with that. But we’re not only advocating for students, but for those who work for students, those who aren’t paid a living wage [in our] community by our Jesuit institution. I want to bridge the gap between them and us as an institution. We want to institute a community Benefits agreement between Loyola and the Rogers Park community.”

If elected, what will you do differently than past presidents?

“We don’t necessarily want to do anything differently. [Current President] Flavio and I have accomplished a lot and it’s a continuation of what we’ve accomplished,” Fasullo said. “This student government has done more than [it has] ever done before. We’ve created a scholarship for those who do not qualify for federal aid … and we’ve started on a track towards getting workers a living wage.”

Aamir Kadri and Amanda Koenig

Photo courtesy of Aamir Kadri and Amanda Koenig.
Photo courtesy of Aamir Kadri and Amanda Koenig.

Who is on this ballot?

Presidential candidate Aamir Kadri and his vice presidential candidate Amanda Koenig are both 21-year-old juniors. Kadri is an economics major and chemistry and math double minor. Koenig is a biochemistry major with minors in math and women’s and gender studies.

What past experience do they have?

Although Koenig has never held a formal position with SGLC, she has worked with senators on initiatives including the 5 Year Strategic Plan and a letter that was turned into the Higher Learning Coalition.

Kadri has been serving as chief of student organizations this year, and was on the university senate and board of trustees his sophomore year.

What is their campaign platform?

The two are basing their campaign on the student promise.

“For care for self, we want to highlight the issues with Campus Safety, Bystander Awareness and our university’s academic support system. For care for others, we hope to broaden the inclusivity and diversity of our student body, and revive the support systems and resources available for all students. For care for community, we plan to increase neighbor outreach, establish a fair trade resolution and affirm an effective student voice,” said the running mates in an email to The Phoenix.

If elected, what will you do differently than past presidents?

“If elected, then I will ensure the success of our initiatives, and here’s why: Our platform is something that we can accomplish within our one-year term,” Kadri said. “Past tickets led initiatives that carried over for years, leading to a lot of overlap and the inability of SGLC leadership to implement change. I promise to come in, tackle our  initiatives and let the future leadership create their own, without having to worry about finishing up ours.”

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Grace Runkel is the former editor-in-chief of The PHOENIX. She’s from Floyds Knobs, Indiana, a small town just north of Louisville, Kentucky. There she’s interned with multiple news outlets, as well as at WGN in Chicago. One of her favorite journalism memories is getting to interview Lee Crooks — the voice of the CTA.

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