Loyola Phoenix

Porn and Chicken: A Staple Recipe for Chicago’s Monday Nights

DJ’s Dom Brown, Orville Kline and Fei Tang form the legendary Porn and Chicken (PNC), a production team known for their Monday night ragers at the legendary Chicago club, The Mid.

The ever-so-popular parties feature live music, burlesque and a chicken wing buffet, leading PNC to be known as one of the city’s best dance parties.

PNC started as a weekly rave and later began producing their own remixes such as “Riot” and “Snapchat That Booty Clap.”

Not only does PNC perform at local music festivals including North Coast and Freaky Deaky, but the trio tours nationally and internationally for audiences in New York, California, Hawaii and Japan.

Porn and Chicken performed at North Coast for the sixth year playing a back-to-back set with dubstep duo, 2FAC3D. Before PNC captivated audiences with their remixes, The Phoenix caught up with Brown and Kline about their infamous parties and discussed the culture of PNC.

Porn and Chicken started as a party that happened on Monday nights, and it has since shifted to production, as well. How did you guys decide to take this step?

Dom Brown: We started as a party back in 2009, I think. It was kind of the natural progression. Everyone that’s involved comes together as a collective. I do vocals, Orville does most of our production work, and it just seemed like the natural thing to do to move into that as we started to play stages and as we started to perform. … Orville and I’s roots are in rock ‘n’ roll, metal and punk rock in the first place, so it just seemed like, “Why not bring the things that we love to what we’re doing.

PNC is a safe haven for all things lewd, crude and lascivious. The event is in its eighth year — what has remained the same, and what’s next for PNC this year?

Brown: My body has changed.

Orville Kline: We’ve finally grown into ourselves.

Brown: I feel like, oh my God, man, dude, since we started Porn and Chicken, it’s actually been about almost ten years. Nothing’s been the same. We were making it cool to be weird before it was the culture — before you had all these safe spaces. … We were telling people they couldn’t have their phones [at the party] because we didn’t want people being body shamed, and we were telling people to lose their inhibitions. Back then, where it was like, we were the counterculture, I feel like now it’s more kosher.

Kline: It seems like everyone kind of caught up with us.

Brown: Now it’s cool to be weird. When we started, it wasn’t cool to be weird. It wasn’t cool to be different … It was so important for us to make a space for people to come be themselves, free of judgement, free of the harm that is social media and shit like that. We wanted people to be safe and really party hard.

There is a no photo policy at your event. How has that played into cultivating a culture around Porn & Chicken within the context of the Chicago dance scene?

Brown: I’ll tell you when it happened. There was a girl that was on top of the bar, and she was a thicker girl. She was living her fucking life — she was partying so hard. Someone took a photo of her and fucking posted it online, and they were talking shit about her. I was appalled. And from that moment on, we were like, “I never want anything like this to happen to anyone ever again. Of course, we didn’t want people to see how crazy we were getting, too. So it was like, ‘No more phones allowed.” It seemed like … it got incredibly crazy and I think that really played a major part in how cool our party is. When you’re always on your phone, you can’t be connected — you’re not in the moment. We never wanted people to share the experience. If you want to experience Porn and Chicken, you have to come. You’ve got to be there.

I was noticing even in the crowds here at North Coast, there are groups of teenagers standing at a performance on their phones and talking.

Brown: They’re just looking through their phones, like what kind of experience is that? If you’re in a club, why not fully immerse yourself in the experience? These kids don’t fucking party, that’s the problem. They’re there to be seen and look good. If your ass is partying, you don’t have time to be taking photos. You’re taking shots, ripping lines, going in. They don’t do that. Think about it, there is no real party culture. All those real die-hard parties are gone, and that’s partially due to technology.

Now you guys have played North Coast several times in the past — what sets this fest apart from all the others?

Orville: A lot of our close friends are involved in throwing it every year, so this is a great way to wrap up the summer.

Brown: They call it “Summer’s last stand.” It’s kind of like the last real rip.

Orville: It’s all our friends and family, everyone we’ve been working with all year, comes out and hangs out and gets involved in the production. Whether they’re performing or bartending or hosting or vending cool merchandise, all that stuff kind of comes together. I feel like there’s a lot of Chicago involved.

You’re playing a back to back set with 2FAC3D, what are y’all bringing to decks production-wise tonight?

Brown: First and foremost, big shoutout to 2FAC3D. Those are guys we have really taken under our wings and looked after, as far as trying to get them on shows. Their process has been amazing to watch, and when we first thought of this idea, it’s a great synergy. Their music is a lot like ours. We have a collab together that’s going to be dropping on Dune Music, so they’re going to bring the bass, and we’re going to bring our live tracks. So we’re going to be doing a lot of our new live songs and that’s going to match their music.

Orville: It’s a nice balance.

Oh and I have to ask, where’s your favorite chicken spot in the city?

Brown: Harold’s Chicken, hands down.

Orville: Yeah, for fried chicken, for sure.

Do you guys frequent Harold’s?

Brown: I don’t get there enough, but yeah. I mean, I owe chicken my success.

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