Community

Rogers Park Police District Announces Plans to Increase Crime Fighting Technology

Courtesy of Daniel SchwenNew technology is set to be used in Rogers Park, according to Moore.

Authorities are planning to use cameras, GPS technology and new mobile phones to combat crime in Rogers Park.

The Chicago Police Department’s 24th district — which covers parts of Rogers Park and Edgewater — intends to increase its technology in hopes of reducing crime in the neighborhood, according to a press release from Joe Moore, Chicago’s 49th Ward Alderman.

The developments in technology come during a period of heightened insecurity for Rogers Park residents following a recent murder spree. Two people were shot Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 near Loyola — which is still under investigation, The Phoenix reported.

The district plans to open a strategic deployment center in its station, according to the release. It said the center will be staffed by analysts from the University of Chicago Crime Lab, which is designed to develop programs to reduce violent crime.

This is part of the city’s “smart policing strategy” which Moore claimed has been successful in other police districts. Surveillance cameras are set to be installed in various locations throughout the neighborhood and will be monitored from an office in the station 24/7, the release said.

The new technology will also include predictive software and mapping technology using data such as past crimes, which will help officers respond to reports more effectively, according to the release.

Officers of the 24th district will also be given mobile phones for access to intelligence information while working in the field, helping their patrols to be “smarter,” the release said.

Chicago’s 12th District, which patrols the Near West Side neighborhood, started using the “smart policing strategy” in March, Moore said. He claimed there’s been a 15 percent reduction in robberies, 35 percent reduction in carjackings, 37 percent reduction in shootings and  64 percent reduction in murder since it was implemented.

Moore also said his office has sponsored expungement seminars to provide information on how to clear a criminal record, and said he sponsors an annual job fair to help people obtain jobs in the community. The city is investing in youth mentoring programs, which Moore said is part of the “solution” to violence in the community.

“This holistic approach to crime fighting — more effective policing strategies combined with investing in youth, second chances and jobs — is the key to making our neighborhood and city safer,” he said in the release.

Moore didn’t respond to The Phoenix’s request for comment at the time of publication.

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Assistant News Editor

Mary Chappell is an assistant news editor at The Phoenix and studies journalism at Loyola. Mary grew up in Denver, Colorado, and loves to make music, drink coffee, attend concerts and watch baseball.

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