Opinion

One day in 1963, Loyola sophomore Marie Leaner wanted to learn how to swim, but she ended up starting a protest movement instead.

Opinion

It’s been two years since a change to Loyola’s media policy created a crisis that seriously threatened The Phoenix’s ability to do good journalism.

Opinion

Every four years Americans are sold on a set of ideas. Not just about the candidates they vote for, or the platforms they espouse, but also about the values of the country that they live in. American presidential elections can make our democracy appear a lot more democratic than it really is.

Opinion

In March 1963, Loyola University Chicago made nationwide headlines when its men’s basketball team, the Loyola Ramblers, beat the Cincinnati Bobcats 60-58 in the final round of the NCAA championship. Their victory marked a turning point in the history of college basketball and the civil rights movement. Never before had an integrated college team starting four Black players on a five-man squad gone on to win a national title.

Opinion

When Loyola’s Presidential Search Committee announced Jo Ann Rooney was its pick back in the summer of 2016, her elevation marked the beginning of a new chapter in the university’s history. Of 23 presidents to come before her, Rooney would be the first woman and the first non-Jesuit to take the top job.

Opinion

At 10 a.m. Feb. 13, I got up in front of a crowd of about 40 Loyola students and faculty members. They were gathered outside the Institute of Environmental Sustainability (IES) to protest Loyola’s endowment …