Steve Woltmann | Loyola AthleticsSeniors Lucas Williamson and Cameron Krutwig hug after their last regular season game and winning the MVC Title.

A win against Southern Illinois University and a loss for Drake University has earned the No. 21 Loyola men’s basketball team (21-4, 15-2) the Missouri Valley Conference (MVC) Regular Season Championship.  The Ramblers took on …

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Theater

Kalliope Bessler, a 21-year-old junior at Loyola studying theater, was taking a Shakespeare class when she was tasked with a monologue from Titania, the queen of the fairies in William Shakespeare’s  “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” …

News

During a normal school year, Loyola students have access to the Intercampus Shuttle, which takes them between Lake Shore Campus (LSC) and Water Tower Campus (WTC). For the duration of the spring 2021 semester due …

Opinion

The war on drugs in the United States has been successful at doing two things: criminalizing Black communities and wasting taxpayer dollars. What it hasn’t done, however, is combat substance abuse problems across the country. The time to change that is now, and new drug reform legislation in Oregon indicates for the first time, states may be heading away from the ineffective, Nixon-era philosophies regarding drug law enforcement — and it’s a good thing.

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Sports

Men's Basketball

A win against Southern Illinois University and a loss for Drake University has earned the No. 21 Loyola men’s basketball team (21-4, 15-2) the Missouri Valley Conference (MVC) Regular Season Championship.  The Ramblers took on …

Arts & Entertainment

Theater

Kalliope Bessler, a 21-year-old junior at Loyola studying theater, was taking a Shakespeare class when she was tasked with a monologue from Titania, the queen of the fairies in William Shakespeare’s  “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” …

Opinion

Opinion

The war on drugs in the United States has been successful at doing two things: criminalizing Black communities and wasting taxpayer dollars. What it hasn’t done, however, is combat substance abuse problems across the country. The time to change that is now, and new drug reform legislation in Oregon indicates for the first time, states may be heading away from the ineffective, Nixon-era philosophies regarding drug law enforcement — and it’s a good thing.